Question: Could Or Can You Please?

Could you please vs Would you please?

Or, could you please close the door.

A.

I don’t see much difference.

But I would suppose that “would” is more polite, because it expresses the idea of probability, and of willingness, and of the desire that something be done, whereas “could” is more in the realm of ability (yes I can)..

Could you please or can you please which is more polite?

Both are correct. The first is more direct, and the second is more polite. Could you please . . . gives slightly more room for refusal than Can you please . . .

Could you please vs May you please?

In this case, may is wrong because she is not asking or giving permission: she is making a request. So: may and can are used interchangeably when asking or giving permission. would (or will) and can (or could) are used interchangeably when making a request.

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

How can I use could in a sentence?

“Could” is a modal verb used to express possibility or past ability as well as to make suggestions and requests. “Could” is also commonly used in conditional sentences as the conditional form of “can.” Examples: Extreme rain could cause the river to flood the city.

How do you politely ask for something?

Here are some tips on asking for favors:Be direct but polite. … Don’t make it sound bad. … Avoid guilt. … Don’t cross the line. … Show respect. … Avoid constant one-sided favors. … Be personal but straightforward. … Take “No” for an answer.More items…•

Where is could used?

Could: “Could” is used to express possibility. Something that could happen is not necessarily something that must happen. Could does not express desire or opinion. It is simply used to state one or more things that are possible (even if they are unlikely) or were possible in the past (even if they didn’t happen).

Can and could grammar?

We sometimes use be able to instead of “can” or “could” for ability. Be able to is possible in all tenses – but “can” is possible only in the present and “could” is possible only in the past for ability. In addition, “can” and “could” have no infinitive form.

What is the difference between can and could?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Can could tenses?

Can is called a modal verb. It doesn’t have all of the tenses that verbs usually have. It has the simple past tense could, but no past participle. When a past participle is needed, the expression be able to is used instead.

Could you tell me or can you tell me?

“Yes I can tell you” or “Yes I could tell you.” Most likely if it is a polite question, “could” would probably be more appropriate, though they are used pretty much interchangeably in casual speech.

Would you or will you?

Would: How They’re Different (and How to Use Each) The main difference between will and would is that would can be used in the past tense but will cannot. Also, would is commonly used to refer to a future event that may occur under specific conditions, while will is used more generally to refer to future events.

Which is correct could you or can you?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations. We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something. We use “could” when we are making a request. Teacher to students: “Can you please be quiet!”

Is could you please a question?

Depending on context, a sentence may or may not merit a question mark. … Question marks should not follow questions that are disguised requests: “Could you please close the door on your way out.” (In writing, such requests are best rendered more concisely: “Please close the door on your way out.”)

Can I use could for future?

We often use could to express possibility in the present and the future.